MTSS


McMonagle

Elementary

 

 

 

Multi-Tier System of Support

(MTSS)

 

 

“Empowering all students to learn through systematic school-wide support”


 

 

 

Experience has demonstrated that in order to increase achievement, successful systems plan their improvement efforts collaboratively. Developing one common plan for improvement streamlines the school and district’s efforts and resources, and maximizes improvement for all learners. The Michigan Continuous School Improvement Process serves as a comprehensive process to organize the work through data analysis, goal setting, planning, implementing, monitoring, and evaluating. By strategically embedding an MTSS framework into the district and school improvement plan, a school system sets itself up for continuity and alignment in the implementation of a research-based system of MTSS. When working together, the Michigan Continuous School Improvement Process and the MTSS framework enhance and strengthen each other for the benefit of all learners.

 

 

 What is MTSS?

 

A Multi-Tiered System of Supports (MTSS) is a term used to describe an evidence-based model of schooling that uses data-based problem solving to integrate academic and behavioral instruction and intervention. The integrated instruction and intervention is delivered to students in varying intensities (multiple tiers) based on student need. “Need-driven” decision-making seeks to ensure that district resources reach the appropriate students (schools) at the appropriate levels to accelerate the performance of ALL students to achieve and/or exceed proficiency.

 

The MTSS model provides the following:

 

  • High-quality instruction and intervention that is matched to the student’s individual needs.
  • Frequent assessment through progress monitoring to make decisions about change in instructional strategies and goals.
  • Educational decisions, based on the results of progress monitoring, which include intervention selection and possibly placement in special education programs.

 

 

Explanation of Each Tier:

 

Tier I:

Interventions at this level are referred to as primary interventions and are school/classroom-wide systems that are in place for ALL students.  This tier should adequately serve the student population.  The main Tier I academic intervention is the general education curriculum.  Students remain in Tier I throughout the school year unless they are not making adequate progress within the general education curriculum. 

 

Tier I is characterized by high-quality, scientifically based instruction that occurs in the general education classroom and is implemented by the general education teacher.  The use of scientifically based programs and practices ensure that student difficulties cannot be attributed to inappropriate or ineffective poor-quality classroom instruction. 

 

 

Tier II:

Interventions at this level are referred to as secondary interventions.  These interventions are specialized group systems for at-risk students.  This tier should adequately serve the population of students within the school, those for whom Tier I alone is not enough.  When a student is struggling, according to screening or progress monitoring, an appropriate instructional intervention is implemented and progress within that intervention is monitored. 

 

Tier II interventions are provided in small groups, usually 3-5 students.  Progress should be monitored at least bi-weekly.  Tier II should provide an intervention 4-5 times per week for 20-30 minutes per session.  The interventions that are used at Tier II are to be scientifically based and proven effective with the population that is targeted.  The Tier II interventions can be delivered by the general education teacher as well as the resource teacher (reading or math specialist).  Tier II is considered to be a group of interventions that are intended to remediate the student’s deficits and promote participation in the general education curriculum. 

 

Tier III:

 

Interventions at this level are referred to as tertiary interventions.  Tertiary interventions are specialized individualized systems for students with intensive needs.  Tier III services may mean the student receives special education services, but Tier III interventions do not automatically mean the student will be assessed and may qualify for special education. 

 

Tier III interventions are more intensive than Tier II interventions and typically involve smaller groups.  Tier III interventions should take place 5 days per week for an additional 60 minutes per session, in addition to the general education curriculum.  Progress should be monitored at least weekly, but can be monitored up to 3 times per week. 

 

 School-Wide Screening:

 

Within the MTSS model, school-wide screening is used to determine which students might be at-risk and in need of closer monitoring in the general education curriculum.  School-wide screening also serves to identify students in need of further assessment and possible inclusion in Tier II and Tier III intervention.

 

It is recommended that schools use school-wide screening three times a year (fall, winter, spring) in combination with other progress monitoring techniques to identify students who require more intense interventions.  The data that is collected is compared to grade level criteria, which are available for the benchmarks in order to determine what students are not currently on target for in grade level.  This data is used, in conjunction with teacher input, to determine what students may be at risk for future academic difficulty.

 

Instructional Practices at Tier Levels:

 

Tier I

 

The delivery of instruction in Tier 1 is focused on grade level/subject area standards using effective large and small group instructional strategies.  Differentiated instruction occurs to a degree that is appropriate for the size and diverse learning abilities of the group and the instructional skills of the teacher. The number of minutes per day of Tier I instruction is based on district standards for what all students are expected to be exposed to for a particular content/subject area and is often determined by state guidelines or regulations. For instance, ninety minutes per day is the typical number of minutes that students in elementary grades receive instruction in literacy. Sixty minutes per day is the typical number of minutes of exposure to mathematics. The impact of Tier I instruction should result in students achieving grade level expectations (e.g., proficiency) or making significant growth in the case in which the typical student is performing below grade/subject standards.

 

Tier II Interventions:

 

Before/After School Programs
Developmental Kindergarten
Junior First Grade 
Successmaker

 

 

Tier III Interventions

 

 

Individual student groupings in reading and math

Special Education Program

 

 

 

McMonagle Elementary

Trifold for Program Evaluation Grades K-2

Intervention: Tier II and III reading interventions

Specific Purpose for Intervention: There are three specific tier 2/3 reading interventions (accuracy, fluency, and comprehension) provided to our lowest performing readers in Kindergarten thru second grade.

Eligibility Criteria/ Screening Procedure

  1. All students are given the Dibels Next Benchmark reading assessment at the beginning of the year. The students who perform at the Intensive Intervention Level are then assessed with a DRA, MLPP protocol.

 

  1. The teachers closely analyze the protocol to determine the main reason why the student is struggling with reading. (Accuracy, Fluency or Comprehension.)

 

  1. During Data Day meetings, the lowest performing students are then assigned to a small group intervention slot with a Title 1 paraprofessional.

Key Components (program frequency, duration of intervention, ratio, strategies, implementation elements)

 

The small intervention groups meet 5 days a week for 20-30 minutes. They are grouped by area of need and there can be 1, 2, 3, or 4 students in a group with a Title 1 paraprofessional. This small group time will focus on the following different interventions:

 

  • Letter/Sound Identification
  • First Sound Fluency
  • Phoneme Segmentation Fluency
  • Nonsense Word Fluency (CVC)
  • Sight Word Recognition
  • Word Attack Skills
  • Reading For Fluency Practice
  • Reading For Comprehension

 

Exit Criteria and Expectations for Success

 

*Exit criteria: Student shows improvement and is no longer performing at the Intensive Intervention Level on the Dibels Next Benchmark Assessment. This is given at the beginning, middle, and end of the school year.

*Progress monitoring: After 4-6 weeks of small group intervention, students are progress monitored using Dibels Next. The teachers will also progress monitor these students using the DRA progress monitoring kit.

*Expectation for success: The students are making gains and testing in the Strategic or Benchmark Level of Dibels. They are no longer in the Intensive Intervention Level. Students are also making progress in the classroom and teachers assist in determining success.

 

 

 

 

 

McMonagle Elementary

Trifold for Program Evaluation Grades 3-6

Intervention: Tier two/three reading interventions

Specific Purpose for Intervention: There is specific tier 2/3 reading interventions (comprehension) provided to our lowest performing readers in third thru sixth grade.

Eligibility Criteria/ Screening Procedure

  1. All students take the SRI reading assessment at the beginning of the year. The students who perform in urgent intervention level are then assessed with a DRA protocol.
  2. The teachers closely analyze the protocol to determine the main reason why the student is struggling with reading, (First accuracy is considered. If not accuracy then fluency is considered. If neither of those interventions is needed then a comprehension intervention is put in place.)
  3. During Data Day meetings, the lowest performing students are then assigned to an intervention slot within the READ180/System 44 intervention program.

 

Key Components (program frequency, duration of intervention, ratio, strategies, and implementation elements)
Students meet with the reading teacher 50 minutes per day, 4 days per week. There are 8 students in each group, and 2 groups per session. The teacher works with grades 3-6. Two different interventions are used based on the needs of students:

  • READ180- Computer intervention session-students will work with vocabulary, fluency, comprehension skills and word study. Small group instruction- students work on comprehension strategies using informational text.
  • System 44- Computer intervention session- students work with systematic phonics and decoding strategies, syllable strategies, and word analysis. Small group instruction- guided and independent reading where students practice using these skills.

Exit Criteria and Expectations for Success

Exit criteria: Student is accelerated and is no longer performing in the urgent intervention level during the SRI assessment. The SRI assessment is given to the student by the reading teacher after 13 weeks of intervention.

 

Progress monitoring: The SRI assessment also provides the SGP (student growth percentiles) for each of the students. The students take the SRI assessment after 30 sessions. The classroom teachers will progress monitor the students using the DRA progress monitoring kit.

 

Expectation for success: The students are accelerated and have SGP scores at or above grade level Lexile band. Reading and Classroom teachers hold further data meetings to analyze student success.

 

 

 

 

 

 

McMonagle Elementary

Trifold for Program Evaluation Grades K-2

Intervention: Tier two/three math interventions

Specific Purpose for Intervention: There are three specific tier 2/3 math interventions (accuracy, math fact fluency) provided to our lowest performing math students in Kindergarten thru second grade.

Eligibility Criteria/ Screening Procedure

  1. All students are given the Dibels easyCBM CCSS Benchmark math assessment at the beginning of the year. The students who perform at the Intensive Intervention Level are further assessed by classroom teachers.

 

  1. The teachers closely analyze the protocol to determine the main reason why the student is struggling with math.

 

  1. During Data meetings, the lowest performing students are then assigned to a small group intervention.

Key Components (program frequency, duration of intervention, ratio, strategies, implementation elements)

The small intervention groups meet 5 days a week for 20-30 minutes. They are grouped by area of need and there can be 1, 2, 3, or 4 students in a group with a Title 1 paraprofessional. This small group time will focus on the following different interventions:

Exit Criteria and Expectations for Success

*Exit criteria: Student shows improvement and is no longer performing at the Intensive Intervention Level on the Dibels easyCBM CCSS Benchmark Assessment. This is given at the beginning, middle, and end of the school year.

*Progress monitoring: After 4-6 weeks of small group intervention, students are progress monitored using easyCBM. Teachers will also progress monitor these students using a variety of assessments.

*Expectation for success: The students are making gains and testing in the Strategic or Benchmark Level of Dibels. Students are also making progress in the classroom and teachers assist in determining success.

 

 

 

 

 

 

McMonagle Elementary

Trifold for Program Evaluation Grades 3-6

Intervention: Tier two/three reading interventions

Specific Purpose for Intervention: There are specific tier 2/3 math interventions provided to our lowest performing math students in third through sixth grade.

Eligibility Criteria/ Screening Procedure

  1. All students take the USA Test Prep Math Benchmark assessment at the beginning of the year. The students who perform in urgent intervention level are then further evaluated by the classroom teacher.
  2. The teachers closely analyze the protocol to determine the main reason why the student is struggling with math
  3. During Data meetings, the lowest performing students are then assigned to a small group intervention slot with a Title 1 paraprofessional

Key Components (program frequency, duration of intervention, ratio, strategies, implementation elements)

 

The small intervention groups meet 5 days a week for 20-30 minutes. They are grouped by area of need and there can be 1, 2, 3, or 4 students in a group with a Title 1 paraprofessional. This small group time will focus on the following different interventions:

Exit Criteria and Expectations for Success

Exit criteria: Student is accelerated and is no longer performing in the urgent intervention level during the USA Test Prep. The assessment is given to the student by the math intervention teacher after 13 weeks of intervention.

 

Progress monitoring:

 

Expectation for success: The students are accelerated and have math scores at or above grade level test average. Math and Classroom teachers hold further data meetings to analyze student success.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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